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Cycling Along the Northern Explorer Connector

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It was Deepavali yesterday and so we decided to spend it exploring the Northern Explorer Connector Network Cycling Trail (that's a mouthful!).  We started off at the junction of Woodlands Ave 5 and 12 and cycled through Upper and Lower Seletar Reservoirs before stopping at Khatib for lunch and then cycled through Sembawang and back to Woodlands Ave 12. 





We went very prepared - lots of water, sunblock, mozzie repellent, cycling helmets, and fruit to nibble on.  It was an intensive 3 hour cycle, but I'm proud to say that we didn't feel sore afterwards, just extremely knackered!  We were surprised to find that it was quite a deserted trail except for the occasional professional cyclists - well, compared to us, that is :-)



I think the exciting bit was cycling through Mandai.  We had seen a group of monkeys on the cycling track and we were wondering what to do as there was only 3 of us. We tried very hard to keep our distance from them and we got a couple of sqwaks!  About 500m away, we made the wrong decision to have a water break at a bus stop and eat our fruit.  Then, in the distance I saw this monkey come running towards us, and well, we had to make a dash too!!!  When we passed another bus stop, we saw a monkey eating a chocolate bar - please don't feed the monkeys!!



The trip back from Khatib was less interesting as it was a very urban route. Love the bike stands though! It's a double deckered bike stand :-)


Will I go on this cycling trip again?  Yes, I will !  One thing you should definitely do before starting the trail is to check the weather.  If there's a storm you definitely don't want to be caught between the Woodlands Park Connector along the Seletar Expressway, and the Ulu Sembawang and Mandai Park Connectors.  These are very exposed areas and there are very few shelters to take cover.  So, play safe!!





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Abdelghafour

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1 comment

  1. Oh my, that looks like a long distance to cycle.... well done!!

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